6 comments

  1. Not sure it’s that serious. Never been a fan of Vettel myself but he’s good enough to hold down a drive in F1 for a few years yet. Just maybe not with a top team. Then it remains to be seen whether he can accept his lot (sorta doing a Kimi) and just enjoy the racing.

  2. I think the problem for me is that this isn’t a one-off event. It’s just the worst in a 12 month period of increasingly worrying driving. Moreover, he has become slow as well as making mistakes. For his sake, I really hope he can hit the reset button during the summer break. Otherwise I can see him having to consider options post-Ferrari.

  3. I agree that he’s made a lot of mistakes in the last year or so. Surely that’s a function of the pressure he’s under, however. He’s supposed to give Ferrari their next championship. He won four championships in the best car and everyone assumed he was something special. Did anyone notice the suspicions that maybe he wasn’t any good in tight racing situations? It may be that we’re seeing the answer to that question. Let’s not forget that embarrassing year with Ricciardo as a team mate.

    Perhaps the best thing that could happen would be for Ferrari to quietly drop its preference for him and transfer it to LeClerc. I think Vettel would be happier without the pressure to be quicker than the latest young hotshoe.

  4. Perhaps the best thing that could happen would be for Ferrari to quietly drop its preference for him and transfer it to LeClerc. I think Vettel would be happier without the pressure to be quicker than the latest young hotshoe.

    I whole-heartedly agree. I’m not sure why Ferrari seem to prefer the ‘one over the other’ approach to driver management. I know the ‘let them race’ mantra is hard to manage, I’m sure Toto Wolff has endured far too many sleepless nights during the Hamilton/Rosberg excapades. But ultimately, it worked at Mercedes. For both. They both became world champions.

    I do think, like Clive, that Vettel would perform better without this added pressure. If he is a sportsperson of any quality (which he surely is) this pressure will be self-induced anyway, but the nonsense of having to deal with it publicly will be one less thing to think about.

    I did though, I must admit, shout out loud “time to retire, Mr Vettel” while watching the race live. It was such a silly mistake, not one that is expected from a multiple champion. In hindsight though, perhaps a different management approach will help. Let’s hope Signore Binotto is listening.

  5. An interesting point, Ollie! I do think Vettel has been heavily influenced by different management styles at Ferrari. Under Maurizio Arrivabene he became very angry and sweary, which I’m assuming is a reflection of Arrivabene’s general approach to life. Under Mattia Binotto he seems rather lost…

  6. I think the problem is that Ferrari is in a mess at the moment, and appears to be expecting its drivers to fix the whole thing with a little help from Mattia Binotto. They can’t, of course – it’s a huge company and everyone needs to pull their weight. They just all express that differently.

    If Ferrari sorted itself out, we’d consistently see a much better Vettel. We may be waiting longer than Vettel’s ability to remain in a top team for that, alas. Thankfully, the last two outings indicate the situation, at least for Seb, is not irretrievable.

    The ball is in Ferrari’s court. (Also, prioritising one driver over another is pointless when it insists on giving both drivers rubbish strategies and cars too picky about set-up position for either of them…)

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