Archive — Fernando Alonso

Fernando Alonso: the F1 great who couldn’t catch a break

Fernando Alonso on his deckchair

Fernando Alonso: the F1 great who couldn’t catch a break

On the eve of Fernando Alonso’s final Formula 1 race, Andrew Benson has written a brilliant five-part article on the key moments in his career. This series is full of fascinating anecdotes and new details about the breakdown of his relationship with McLaren in 2007, what he was really like with Ferrari, and what drove him to move back to McLaren.

More than ever, it’s clear that those who have worked most closely with Fernando Alonso regard him as one of the greatest F1 drivers of all time. It’s all the more shocking that his career has delivered so little in terms of silverware. This series helps explain exactly why that is.

This is probably one of the best articles about Formula 1 I have read for several years.

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Another burned bridge could drive Alonso to Nascar

Another burned bridge could drive Alonso to Nascar

This opinion piece from Dieter Rencken on how Fernando Alonso has destroyed his own F1 career contains an insight on the fate of his team bosses that I wasn’t aware of before.

Every F1 team boss Alonso has driven for save Paul Stoddart (who owned Minardi, and thus could not be fired), lost his job during Alonso’s tenure with that team: Renault’s Flavio Briatore (also his manager), Ferrari’s Stefano Domenicali and Marco Mattiacci, McLaren’s Martin Whitmarsh, Ron Dennis and Eric Boullier. One could also add the names of more than a few senior engineers to this roll call.

It’s quite extraordinary that even Alonso’s heavily-hyped potential move to IndyCar could be thwarted by his own past behaviour.

From me: Fernando Alonso’s failed F1 career presents him with the chance to become a legend

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The art of deciphering Fernando Alonso’s Alonsospeak

The art of deciphering Fernando Alonso’s Alonsospeak

Fernando Alonso is one of the most eloquent speakers in Formula One and one of the best at interacting with the media. But he can also use these opportunities to cultivate certain narratives. Four of his statements during the French Grand Prix weekend — one of the most miserable weekends McLaren has endured in recent years — were perfect examples.

It’s a shame, but this article is bang-on, and it needed to be said.

I am a huge admirer of Fernando Alonso. He is one of the few drivers whose driving is so expressive that it actually comes across on TV.

It is a complete tragedy that he only has two world championships, despite probably being the best driver on the grid. And yet it is probably entirely of his own doing.

In that context, you can understand Alonso’s desire to talk himself up. But it is also transparent, and more than a little bit sad.

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